New Straits Times

CLIENT: New Straits Times

PROJECT: 2013 Thematic Campaign

CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVE:

To increase readership of NST across all platforms, be it the physical newspaper or digital assets. And build a demand for factual, credible news.

CHALLENGE:

The birth of social media has changed the way we get our news today, where we are fed by news instead of the conventional way where readers seek news by reading the papers or watching the news. News Straits Times needed to regain its credibility as the paper that provides true insights and stories to readers, and to educate readers not to speculate news that spreads.

KEY INSIGHT:

We realised that many people were sharing news and information online indiscriminately. They would often believe news that  their friends shared on social media, without actually checking to see if it were credible. They were also more inclined to share news and topics that were controversial, sensational and speculative.

CAMPAIGN STRATEGY:

Based on this insight, we wanted to challenge people to start questioning what they read online and not to take things for granted. We wanted people to see how news can sometimes get out of hand and that they were not always getting the facts. This was there we encouraged them to read the NST because it provides only the facts and insights, hence being ‘A Sharper Read’.

THE BIG IDEA: “Leave no room for speculation”

Print Ads

We created thought-provoking lines that would have people sit up and take notice.

Billboards

The lines also went outdoor.

TVC

We aired 2 commercials with the exact same scenes, with the same characters and same dialogue in both. The difference between the 2 commercials was that the scenes was swapped around. One with a negative outcome. The other, a positive conclusion. Which would you lean towards?

The message: You need one source for the news. And speculation confuses the news.

Version 1

Version 2


RADIO COMMERCIAL

We created an interactive Radio Commercial that lets the listener choose a side. Tune to the left speaker, you hear one thing. Tune to the right speaker, you hear a conflicting report. This was done to prove just how confusing the news is when it comes from different sources.

Using a cocktail effect, we utilized the left and right stereo channels to play two conflicting scripts at the same time – listeners could automatically listen more to the left or right speaker – picking up on the differences. Those stuck in traffic or at home could play with the audio balance of their sound system and actually tune to the left or right speaker, making this a truly interactive radio commercial to drive home a point – that what you need is one reliable source of information. The New Straits Times.

Viral Outbreak

Landslide

THE RESULTS

Readership for NST improved by 34,000 (14%) in 2013 compared to 2012.

Circulation of NST from March to June 2013 also saw an increase.

Mar – Jun 2012

Mar – Jun 2013

Incremental (%)

Circulation

404,128

535,693

32

Readership among Chinese, Indians and others also increased significantly.

2012

2013

Incremental (%)

Chinese

73,000

98,000

+34

India/Others

43,000

67,000

+56

There was also an increase in readership among the younger audience.

2012

2013

Incremental (%)

Below 30 years old

73,000

119,000

+63

Students

31,000

50,000

+61

Some of the ads also got some attention on social media.


We aired 2 commercials with the exact same scenes, with the same characters and the same dialogue in both.

The difference between the two commercials was that the scenes were swapped around. By doing that, we had two different storylines. One with a negative outcome. The other, a positive conclusion. Which would you lean towards?

The message: You need one source for the news. And speculation confuses the news.




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